statement

statement

photo by : Ian Kerstetter

As a creature of the land, I sit at the water’s edge, transfixed by the subtle narrative of its surface. A nylon thread whipping through the air and the sound of a distant splash signify peace to me. Fishing ignites and sustains my art practice. From the perspective of an angler, I investigate the confluences between local water ecologies and human activity. I research issues of water contamination, algae blooms, and invasive species to illuminate the cyclical relationship between humans and water. My work takes a lyrical approach to the presentation of data amassed from research and fieldwork. Utilizing 3D printing, as well as responsive software such as Max MSP, I create sculptural installations consisting of water, field collections, specimens, sound, film and projection. For instance, in my installation SILVERFIN, I fuse functional sculpture with video to create a space to re-introduce viewers to the invasive Asian carp issue. The project discusses the potential for fishing to help control populations of Asian carp. Through fish filleting demonstrations on tables under video projection, I expose people to the fish and the realities of our relationship with nature. Fred Pearce, author of The New Wild writes, “ We buy into some pretty dangerous mythology about how nature works… We have changed the planet too much, and nature never goes backward.” My line of inquiry questions our complicated relationship with nature by teasing out the real connections and impacts we have on bodies of water, and vice versa. It explores the gray area between conservation efforts motivated by our own needs and those motivated by the needs of nature.